Opinions about anything and everything from someone not qualified to make them

 

lofticries:

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to run the Boston marathon. After realizing that a woman was running, race organizer Jock Semple went after Switzer shouting, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” However, Switzer’s boyfriend and other male runners provided a protective shield during the entire marathon. The photographs taken of the incident made world headlines, and Kathrine later won the NYC marathon with a time of 3:07:29.

lofticries:

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to run the Boston marathon. After realizing that a woman was running, race organizer Jock Semple went after Switzer shouting, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” However, Switzer’s boyfriend and other male runners provided a protective shield during the entire marathon. The photographs taken of the incident made world headlines, and Kathrine later won the NYC marathon with a time of 3:07:29.

Daily Show correspondent Michael Che tries to find a safe place to report from.

(Source: sandandglass)

radio-x-maru:

i had the drink one, aka the least cool one

I had me a few of these too. I think the Big Mac.

radio-x-maru:

i had the drink one, aka the least cool one

I had me a few of these too. I think the Big Mac.

So great to see Glover finally get to be Spider-Man. So awesome. Miles Morales was such a great idea.

So great to see Glover finally get to be Spider-Man. So awesome. Miles Morales was such a great idea.

mattfractionblog:

ralfmaximus:

kenyatta:

New app will keep you away from ‘sketchy’ areas

SketchFactor, the brainchild of co-founders Allison McGuire and Daniel Herrington, is a Manhattan-based navigation app that crowdsources user experiences along with publicly available data to rate the relative “sketchiness” of certain areas in major cities. The app will launch on iTunes on Friday, capping off a big week for the startup, which was named as a finalist in NYC BigApps, a city-sponsored competition.
According to Ms. McGuire, a Los Angeles native who lives in the West Village, the impetus behind SketchFactor was her experience as a young woman navigating the streets of Washington, D.C., where she worked at a nonprofit.
"How can we take large amounts of data and crowdsource opinions on certain areas?" she wondered to herself. "I brought that idea to a Lean Startup event in D.C., it got a huge reception and suddenly I was on my way."
The founders are also bracing for potential complications from an app that asks anonymous users to judge a neighborhood’s sketchiness. After all, fear can be subjective. And the site could be vulnerable to criticisms regarding the degree to which race is used to profile a neighborhood.
"We understand that people will see this issue," Ms. McGuire said. "And even though Dan and I are admittedly both young, white people, the app is not built for us as young, white people. As far as we’re concerned, racial profiling is ‘sketchy’ and we are trying to empower users to report incidents of racism against them and define their own experience of the streets."

Doublespeak of the day.

Help me kickstarter my new DogWhistle app that lets me say racist things about neighborhoods while sounding hip & trendy.

"Not Wanting To Sound Like A Racist"? There’s an app for that.

Umm…….

mattfractionblog:

ralfmaximus:

kenyatta:

New app will keep you away from ‘sketchy’ areas

SketchFactor, the brainchild of co-founders Allison McGuire and Daniel Herrington, is a Manhattan-based navigation app that crowdsources user experiences along with publicly available data to rate the relative “sketchiness” of certain areas in major cities. The app will launch on iTunes on Friday, capping off a big week for the startup, which was named as a finalist in NYC BigApps, a city-sponsored competition.

According to Ms. McGuire, a Los Angeles native who lives in the West Village, the impetus behind SketchFactor was her experience as a young woman navigating the streets of Washington, D.C., where she worked at a nonprofit.

"How can we take large amounts of data and crowdsource opinions on certain areas?" she wondered to herself. "I brought that idea to a Lean Startup event in D.C., it got a huge reception and suddenly I was on my way."

The founders are also bracing for potential complications from an app that asks anonymous users to judge a neighborhood’s sketchiness. After all, fear can be subjective. And the site could be vulnerable to criticisms regarding the degree to which race is used to profile a neighborhood.

"We understand that people will see this issue," Ms. McGuire said. "And even though Dan and I are admittedly both young, white people, the app is not built for us as young, white people. As far as we’re concerned, racial profiling is ‘sketchy’ and we are trying to empower users to report incidents of racism against them and define their own experience of the streets."

Doublespeak of the day.

Help me kickstarter my new DogWhistle app that lets me say racist things about neighborhoods while sounding hip & trendy.

"Not Wanting To Sound Like A Racist"? There’s an app for that.

Umm…….